Iguana delicatissima

Lesser Antillean Iguana

Stats

IUCN Status: Critically Endangered
Range: Lesser Antilles
Population: Estimated ~20,000, with 10-15,000 of those on Dominica
Size: Males up to 17″ snout to vent length, 7.7 pounds; Females up to 15″, 5.5 pounds
Threats: Habitat destruction; Introduced predators; Hybridization with Common Green Iguana.

species information

  • The Lesser Antillean Iguana is a large arboreal iguana that once occupied most islands from Anguilla to Martinique in the eastern West Indies. 
  • The total population has declined ~75%, due to habitat destruction, hunting, introduction of exotic predators and competitors, and hybridization with Green Iguanas. 
  • Only two populations are considered stable while others have been extirpated in the last decade.
  • With an estimated population of 13-20,000 individuals, Dominica supported, until recently, the largest single population of these iguanas. However, this population was compromised in 2017 when Green Iguanas were found after Hurricane Maria hit.
  • On St. Eustatius invasive Green Iguanas and hybrids also can be found, but it is believed that this island can still remain a stronghold for the species with proper biosecurity.

IIF Grants Received

Natural history data of hatchling Iguana delicatissima to guide local and regional recruitment and conservation management

Matthijs P. Van den Burg

$1000

Assessing and mitigating threats to Iguana delicatissima on Dominica post-hurricane Maria

Jeanelle Brisbane

$7,700

Preventing the Loss of One of the Last Populations of Iguana delicatissima, the St. Eustatius Population

 

Matthijs P. van den Burg and Adam Mitchell

$11,750

Establishing Baseline Population and Distribution Data to Inform Population Recovery of Iguana delicatissima on Anguilla, British West Indies

Farah Mukhida

$9,830

Action plan publication and implementation review, Cyclura spp. and I. delicatissima)

Lee Pagni

$2,500

The goal of this multi-species IIF grant is to enhance iguana conservation at the international, national, and local levels by publishing action plans as well as reporting on the accomplishment of these plans. Publication of the plans on the IUCN’s website will improve the ability of both international and local conservation organizations to obtain funding to carry out iguana conservation priorities.

Reports from the Field